Stuffed Toys-A senior skilled at stufficide

Tracy Ahrens

It felt like a spontaneous support group session. I stood at the checkout counter of a pet store and the manager was scanning my purchases, including a stuffed pink giraffe dog toy.

He asked me what kind of dog I have. I shared with him and paused before noting that my dog, Angel, 11,  just started playing with stuffed toys, two months after adoption.

Embarrassed that I may own a demonically possessed canine, I noted, “She likes to rip their legs and ears off.”

The manager laughed and put my confession to shame. His dog “goes for the throats” of stuffed toys, ripping out their jugulars. He was shy to describe his house full of throat-less stuffed animal toys.

stuffed toys

My house is a graveyard for limbless, earless, antlerless, tailless creatures.

A fellow dog owner refers to these attacks on innocent stuffed creatures as “stufficide.” Her dog, Bart, is like my Angel. He instantly chews off limbs and, she said, “There’s always a bit of glee in Bart’s eye when he’s performing a medical procedure.”

That same giddy, demonic look comes over my Angel as she performs clean-cut amputations of stuffed animal parts with a grinding molar action.

stuffed toys apart

When Angel came into my life she was given several stuffed toys by a shelter volunteer and I bought her a couple. I had no idea if she liked toys, as she was found with no background information or a name.

One of the toys I gave her was a small Wonder Woman doll with a squeaker in it. She slept in a bed with it, but ignored it. But two months later, something snapped. She got a feisty glimmer in her eye, picked up Wonder Woman in her mouth and started to chew on her. I laughed to myself watching her, until she spit out an arm. Then, the other arm.

The “bracelets of submission” that Wonder Woman uses to deflect gunfire, small missiles and other projectile weaponry, were cut off with the geriatric molars of a shepherd-husky.

This was the start of her obsession with removing appendages from stuffed creatures.

stuffed toys wonder woman

We now have a dinosaur missing a spikey plate from its back, a monkey with one leg, a pink dog with three legs, a pink rabbit with one ear, a cat face with one ear, and that giraffe I bought during my in-store counseling session, it is now missing one ear and one antler.

As the mood strikes her, she strikes another toy, chewing off parts and spitting them out in her beds or on the floor. At first I had a small collection of parts, but I have since disposed of them.

When legs are ripped off of critters, I steal the toys away to mend with sturdy upholstery thread. Angel supervises the surgeries with that same giddy, demonic stare.

Many dogs are annoyed by squeakers and seek them out first to extract from a toy. Angel doesn’t seem to care about killing squeakers. She just wants to rip creatures limb from limb.

stuffed toys mending

Most dog owners have stories of how their canines like to carry around toys, rip them up at warp speed or bring them to bed. A German Shepherd owner told me his dog loved basketballs and deflated them within 20 seconds. Stuffed toys were gutted in less than a half hour, and tennis balls were chewed in half in 60 minutes.

I have to say that one or two stuffed animals always lie on my bed where Angel sleeps beside me. She also occasionally carries one outside when she goes potty, sets it down on the grass and I have to carry it back inside.

Three pet beds in my living room are like islands that hold Angel’s stuffed toy collection. I think of this environment like the Island of Misfit Toys, from the holiday television special Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. That island had oddball toys like a spotted elephant, a “Charlie-in-the-box” and a bird that swims.

stuffed toys dog

I’ve taken photos of Angel’s signature collection, and captured images and videos of her chewing off and spitting out limbs. It’s like photographic evidence from crime scenes.

Many more toys will enter my home just to make Angel happy in her senior years. One bunny she’s removed all of the stuffing from and it shall remain stuffing-less per her request. Two smaller bunnies and a squirrel are her favorites, as she likes to chase bunnies and squirrels in real life. Those toys have been mended countless times and I’m happy to oblige. I even bought an extra stuffed bunny from the store so she has a spare.

I laugh at her silly behavior with these creatures, wondering if she had toys in her past. I’m sure she never had this many and I find joy in making her happy.

 

***

Tracy Ahrens is a veteran journalist, author, artist and mom to three rescued cats and one dog. See her web site at www.tracyahrens.weebly.com and add her children’s book, “Sammy Sparrow’s First Flight,” to your collection. All proceeds help 9 humane organizations.

 

 

The post Stuffed Toys-A senior skilled at stufficide appeared first on Wag The Dog UK.

Tracy Ahrens

It felt like a spontaneous support group session. I stood at the checkout counter of a pet store and the manager was scanning my purchases, including a stuffed pink giraffe dog toy.

He asked me what kind of dog I have. I shared with him and paused before noting that my dog, Angel, 11,  just started playing with stuffed toys, two months after adoption.

Embarrassed that I may own a demonically possessed canine, I noted, “She likes to rip their legs and ears off.”

The manager laughed and put my confession to shame. His dog “goes for the throats” of stuffed toys, ripping out their jugulars. He was shy to describe his house full of throat-less stuffed animal toys.

stuffed toys

My house is a graveyard for limbless, earless, antlerless, tailless creatures.

A fellow dog owner refers to these attacks on innocent stuffed creatures as “stufficide.” Her dog, Bart, is like my Angel. He instantly chews off limbs and, she said, “There’s always a bit of glee in Bart’s eye when he’s performing a medical procedure.”

That same giddy, demonic look comes over my Angel as she performs clean-cut amputations of stuffed animal parts with a grinding molar action.

stuffed toys apart

When Angel came into my life she was given several stuffed toys by a shelter volunteer and I bought her a couple. I had no idea if she liked toys, as she was found with no background information or a name.

One of the toys I gave her was a small Wonder Woman doll with a squeaker in it. She slept in a bed with it, but ignored it. But two months later, something snapped. She got a feisty glimmer in her eye, picked up Wonder Woman in her mouth and started to chew on her. I laughed to myself watching her, until she spit out an arm. Then, the other arm.

The “bracelets of submission” that Wonder Woman uses to deflect gunfire, small missiles and other projectile weaponry, were cut off with the geriatric molars of a shepherd-husky.

This was the start of her obsession with removing appendages from stuffed creatures.

stuffed toys wonder woman

We now have a dinosaur missing a spikey plate from its back, a monkey with one leg, a pink dog with three legs, a pink rabbit with one ear, a cat face with one ear, and that giraffe I bought during my in-store counseling session, it is now missing one ear and one antler.

As the mood strikes her, she strikes another toy, chewing off parts and spitting them out in her beds or on the floor. At first I had a small collection of parts, but I have since disposed of them.

When legs are ripped off of critters, I steal the toys away to mend with sturdy upholstery thread. Angel supervises the surgeries with that same giddy, demonic stare.

Many dogs are annoyed by squeakers and seek them out first to extract from a toy. Angel doesn’t seem to care about killing squeakers. She just wants to rip creatures limb from limb.

stuffed toys mending

Most dog owners have stories of how their canines like to carry around toys, rip them up at warp speed or bring them to bed. A German Shepherd owner told me his dog loved basketballs and deflated them within 20 seconds. Stuffed toys were gutted in less than a half hour, and tennis balls were chewed in half in 60 minutes.

I have to say that one or two stuffed animals always lie on my bed where Angel sleeps beside me. She also occasionally carries one outside when she goes potty, sets it down on the grass and I have to carry it back inside.

Three pet beds in my living room are like islands that hold Angel’s stuffed toy collection. I think of this environment like the Island of Misfit Toys, from the holiday television special Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. That island had oddball toys like a spotted elephant, a “Charlie-in-the-box” and a bird that swims.

stuffed toys dog

I’ve taken photos of Angel’s signature collection, and captured images and videos of her chewing off and spitting out limbs. It’s like photographic evidence from crime scenes.

Many more toys will enter my home just to make Angel happy in her senior years. One bunny she’s removed all of the stuffing from and it shall remain stuffing-less per her request. Two smaller bunnies and a squirrel are her favorites, as she likes to chase bunnies and squirrels in real life. Those toys have been mended countless times and I’m happy to oblige. I even bought an extra stuffed bunny from the store so she has a spare.

I laugh at her silly behavior with these creatures, wondering if she had toys in her past. I’m sure she never had this many and I find joy in making her happy.

 

***

Tracy Ahrens is a veteran journalist, author, artist and mom to three rescued cats and one dog. See her web site at www.tracyahrens.weebly.com and add her children’s book, “Sammy Sparrow’s First Flight,” to your collection. All proceeds help 9 humane organizations.

 

 

The post Stuffed Toys-A senior skilled at stufficide appeared first on Wag The Dog UK.

Tips For Traveling Alone With A Pet

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.comRoad trips are my favorite kind of vacation. The excitement of choosing a destination, packing the car, and hitting the open road makes me absolutely giddy. These days most of my traveling is done with Rod and the boys, but once in a while a situation pops up that requires me to spend a day or two traveling on my own. On those occasions taking Ty or Buster with me makes the trip more fun, and gives us some special one-on-one time to connect.

While solo outings are delightful, traveling alone with a pet requires some additional preparation. Whether your favorite road trip buddy is a dog, cat, hamster, or bunny, these tips will help keep you both safe and happy on your next excursion.

Plan Your Route – Once you’ve decided where to go, it’s important to plan your route and identify any accommodations you’ll need along the way. The GoPetFriendly.com road trip planner is a great place to start, allowing you to map the course and locate pet friendly hotels, campgrounds, restaurants, and attractions along the way. Determining the number of miles you can cover per day depends on your preferences. If you like to mosey and take in the sights, 100 miles may be far enough in a day. If you’re more intent on getting to your destination, you might drive 300 miles or more, just stopping for fuel and comfort breaks. Use your smartphone app to check driving times and alert you to any road construction or detours you might encounter to plan pit stops for your pet.
Make Reservations – If your trip involves overnight stays, don’t leave your accommodations to chance. There’s nothing worse than pulling into a hotel at the end of a long day of driving to find they don’t accept pets or are completely booked. Before you leave, call the hotel, campground, or rental property where you’ll be staying to confirm their pet policy and make your reservation.

Related Article: Travel Like a Pro: 8 Questions to Ask When Booking a Pet Friendly Hotel

Travel Like a Pro: 8 Questions to Ask When Booking a Pet Friendly Hotel | GoPetFriendly.com

Share Your Itinerary and Check In – Once your plans are squared away, be sure to share them with a friend or family member. Give them the route you plan to take and the telephone numbers of the places you’ll be staying. During your trip, be sure to keep in touch with that person to let them know where you are on your journey and if you’ve made any adjustments to your route or schedule.
Invest in Road Side Assistance – Before any road trip, make an appointment to have all routine maintenance completed on your vehicle; also consider signing up for a roadside assistance plan. There are several options available, and if you get a flat tire or accidentally lock your keys in the car, it’s better to have reliable help than counting on a stranger to assist you.
Prepare Your Travel Buddy – Anytime your pets are in the car, you’ll want to pack some basics, including their current vaccination records and recent medical history. In addition, to keep you both safe, your pet should be buckled up in a safety harness or secured carrier while you’re driving. Trying to wrangle Fido when he hops into the front seat, or catch Fluffy as she saunters across the dash, is too dangerous when you’re driving.

Related Article: Packing an Overnight Bag for Your Dog

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Post Your Emergency Instructions – If something should happen to you while you’re traveling, having your emergency instructions visible in your car will allow first responders to quickly contact anyone you’d want notified of your condition, and get your pet cared for until you can recover. Writing “In Case of Emergency” on an envelope and taping it to your glove box with the instructions inside is a good way to make sure it can’t be overlooked.

Be Smart and Trust Your Instincts – Making sure you all get home safe is the most important part of any road trip, and when you’re traveling alone, you need to stay vigilant. Keep your doors locked while you’re driving, be aware of your surroundings at all times, choose stops that are populated and well-lit, and trust your gut – if something feels sketchy, get back in your car and leave. To help ensure you don’t become a target, dress casually, leave expensive jewelry at home, and consider trading your purse for a fanny pack or money belt. It’s also a good idea to divide up any cash you’re taking and keep it in multiple locations.
Where to Eat – Depending on how long you’ll be gone, packing food from home is the best way to ensure you’ll have something delicious to eat along the way – but keep it in a sealed container so your pet can’t help himself! If you’ll be away more than a day and fast food drive-thrus don’t appeal to you, find restaurants with pet friendly outdoor seating areas using GoPetFriendly.com, or call in a take-out order and keep one eye on your car while you’re inside picking up your food.

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Restroom Breaks – The biggest question most solo travelers grapple with is what to do about restroom breaks. Leaving a pet alone in the car while you use the bathroom isn’t ideal, but most rest stops, stores, and restaurants don’t allow furry travel companions to accompany you to the facilities. You could travel with a portable toilet, but then you’d have to create a privacy screen to use it and deal with cleaning it. Instead, these are the steps I take to ensure Ty or Buster is comfortable for the few minutes I need to be away:

Park in the shade.
Place a sunscreen across the windshield to reflect sunlight and to make it more difficult for passersby to see inside the car.
Use a spill-proof bowl and give your pet access to plenty of fresh water.
If the weather is warm, you can use a cooling mat to give your pet a comfortable place to lay, and keeping it inside a cooler with some ice until you need it will make it even chillier for dogs and cats with heavy coats. You can also also get a portable travel fan to increase the circulation inside the car.
If you’re concerned your pet could be stolen from your vehicle, consider placing her in a pet carrier or collapsable crate with a lock on the door.
If it’s hot or cold enough to put your pet’s health at risk, a remote-start system will allow you to leave the air conditioning or heat running to keep your pet comfortable. Or you can carry an extra key – one to leave in the ignition with the car running, and a second to unlock the door when you return. Always set your parking brake and engage the child locks on the windows when leaving your pet in a running vehicle. (Note that leaving an unattended vehicle running may violate the law in some jurisdictions, as it could encourage auto theft. For the 3-5 minutes it takes me to use a restroom and return to the car, I’m willing to prioritize my dog’s safety over getting a ticket.)
Anytime you leave your pet alone in the car, set the alarm on your phone for 10 minutes and be sure you’re back to the vehicle before the alarm goes off.

Related Article: Is It Illegal to Leave Your Pet Alone in the Car?

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Stick to the Schedule – When traveling with a dog, maintaining his feeding, bathroom, and exercise schedule as much as possible will help reduce any anxiety he may be feeling. Set an alarm on your phone to remind you when these important times are approaching, and be prepared to pull over to stop and sniff the roses.
Carry Safety Devices – Using a safety whistle, pepper spray, or taser can deter unwanted advances from strangers, dangerous dogs, or predatory wildlife. It’s a good idea to keep one or more of these devices handy when you’re traveling on your own.

The first time you do anything it can seem daunting, and traveling alone with a pet is no exception. Share your best solo travel tips in the comments below, and you just might encourage someone else to give it a try!

Planning a pet friendly trip of your own? We’ll make it easy:
Pet Friendly Hotels | Pet Friendly Destinations | Pet Friendly Activities

The post Tips For Traveling Alone With A Pet appeared first on GoPetFriendly.com.

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.comRoad trips are my favorite kind of vacation. The excitement of choosing a destination, packing the car, and hitting the open road makes me absolutely giddy. These days most of my traveling is done with Rod and the boys, but once in a while a situation pops up that requires me to spend a day or two traveling on my own. On those occasions taking Ty or Buster with me makes the trip more fun, and gives us some special one-on-one time to connect.

While solo outings are delightful, traveling alone with a pet requires some additional preparation. Whether your favorite road trip buddy is a dog, cat, hamster, or bunny, these tips will help keep you both safe and happy on your next excursion.

Plan Your Route – Once you’ve decided where to go, it’s important to plan your route and identify any accommodations you’ll need along the way. The GoPetFriendly.com road trip planner is a great place to start, allowing you to map the course and locate pet friendly hotels, campgrounds, restaurants, and attractions along the way. Determining the number of miles you can cover per day depends on your preferences. If you like to mosey and take in the sights, 100 miles may be far enough in a day. If you’re more intent on getting to your destination, you might drive 300 miles or more, just stopping for fuel and comfort breaks. Use your smartphone app to check driving times and alert you to any road construction or detours you might encounter to plan pit stops for your pet.
Make Reservations – If your trip involves overnight stays, don’t leave your accommodations to chance. There’s nothing worse than pulling into a hotel at the end of a long day of driving to find they don’t accept pets or are completely booked. Before you leave, call the hotel, campground, or rental property where you’ll be staying to confirm their pet policy and make your reservation.

Related Article: Travel Like a Pro: 8 Questions to Ask When Booking a Pet Friendly Hotel

Travel Like a Pro: 8 Questions to Ask When Booking a Pet Friendly Hotel | GoPetFriendly.com

Share Your Itinerary and Check In – Once your plans are squared away, be sure to share them with a friend or family member. Give them the route you plan to take and the telephone numbers of the places you’ll be staying. During your trip, be sure to keep in touch with that person to let them know where you are on your journey and if you’ve made any adjustments to your route or schedule.
Invest in Road Side Assistance – Before any road trip, make an appointment to have all routine maintenance completed on your vehicle; also consider signing up for a roadside assistance plan. There are several options available, and if you get a flat tire or accidentally lock your keys in the car, it’s better to have reliable help than counting on a stranger to assist you.
Prepare Your Travel Buddy – Anytime your pets are in the car, you’ll want to pack some basics, including their current vaccination records and recent medical history. In addition, to keep you both safe, your pet should be buckled up in a safety harness or secured carrier while you’re driving. Trying to wrangle Fido when he hops into the front seat, or catch Fluffy as she saunters across the dash, is too dangerous when you’re driving.

Related Article: Packing an Overnight Bag for Your Dog

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Post Your Emergency Instructions – If something should happen to you while you’re traveling, having your emergency instructions visible in your car will allow first responders to quickly contact anyone you’d want notified of your condition, and get your pet cared for until you can recover. Writing “In Case of Emergency” on an envelope and taping it to your glove box with the instructions inside is a good way to make sure it can’t be overlooked.

Be Smart and Trust Your Instincts – Making sure you all get home safe is the most important part of any road trip, and when you’re traveling alone, you need to stay vigilant. Keep your doors locked while you’re driving, be aware of your surroundings at all times, choose stops that are populated and well-lit, and trust your gut – if something feels sketchy, get back in your car and leave. To help ensure you don’t become a target, dress casually, leave expensive jewelry at home, and consider trading your purse for a fanny pack or money belt. It’s also a good idea to divide up any cash you’re taking and keep it in multiple locations.
Where to Eat – Depending on how long you’ll be gone, packing food from home is the best way to ensure you’ll have something delicious to eat along the way – but keep it in a sealed container so your pet can’t help himself! If you’ll be away more than a day and fast food drive-thrus don’t appeal to you, find restaurants with pet friendly outdoor seating areas using GoPetFriendly.com, or call in a take-out order and keep one eye on your car while you’re inside picking up your food.

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Restroom Breaks – The biggest question most solo travelers grapple with is what to do about restroom breaks. Leaving a pet alone in the car while you use the bathroom isn’t ideal, but most rest stops, stores, and restaurants don’t allow furry travel companions to accompany you to the facilities. You could travel with a portable toilet, but then you’d have to create a privacy screen to use it and deal with cleaning it. Instead, these are the steps I take to ensure Ty or Buster is comfortable for the few minutes I need to be away:

Park in the shade.
Place a sunscreen across the windshield to reflect sunlight and to make it more difficult for passersby to see inside the car.
Use a spill-proof bowl and give your pet access to plenty of fresh water.
If the weather is warm, you can use a cooling mat to give your pet a comfortable place to lay, and keeping it inside a cooler with some ice until you need it will make it even chillier for dogs and cats with heavy coats. You can also also get a portable travel fan to increase the circulation inside the car.
If you’re concerned your pet could be stolen from your vehicle, consider placing her in a pet carrier or collapsable crate with a lock on the door.
If it’s hot or cold enough to put your pet’s health at risk, a remote-start system will allow you to leave the air conditioning or heat running to keep your pet comfortable. Or you can carry an extra key – one to leave in the ignition with the car running, and a second to unlock the door when you return. Always set your parking brake and engage the child locks on the windows when leaving your pet in a running vehicle. (Note that leaving an unattended vehicle running may violate the law in some jurisdictions, as it could encourage auto theft. For the 3-5 minutes it takes me to use a restroom and return to the car, I’m willing to prioritize my dog’s safety over getting a ticket.)
Anytime you leave your pet alone in the car, set the alarm on your phone for 10 minutes and be sure you’re back to the vehicle before the alarm goes off.

Related Article: Is It Illegal to Leave Your Pet Alone in the Car?

Tips for Traveling Alone with Pets | GoPetFriendly.com

Stick to the Schedule – When traveling with a dog, maintaining his feeding, bathroom, and exercise schedule as much as possible will help reduce any anxiety he may be feeling. Set an alarm on your phone to remind you when these important times are approaching, and be prepared to pull over to stop and sniff the roses.
Carry Safety Devices – Using a safety whistle, pepper spray, or taser can deter unwanted advances from strangers, dangerous dogs, or predatory wildlife. It’s a good idea to keep one or more of these devices handy when you’re traveling on your own.

The first time you do anything it can seem daunting, and traveling alone with a pet is no exception. Share your best solo travel tips in the comments below, and you just might encourage someone else to give it a try!

Planning a pet friendly trip of your own? We’ll make it easy:
Pet Friendly Hotels | Pet Friendly Destinations | Pet Friendly Activities

The post Tips For Traveling Alone With A Pet appeared first on GoPetFriendly.com.

Staying Organized with an SUV Cargo Divider from Travall

MyDogLikes
MyDogLikes – Dog Product Reviews, Dog Friendly Parks, Dog Friendly Events, Dog Blog

Do your dogs take up your entire cargo area? Learn how an SUV Cargo Divider from Travall can help you reclaim some of that space – and keep everyone safe!

The post Staying Organized with an SUV Cargo Divider from Travall appeared first on MyDogLikes.

MyDogLikes
MyDogLikes – Dog Product Reviews, Dog Friendly Parks, Dog Friendly Events, Dog Blog

Do your dogs take up your entire cargo area? Learn how an SUV Cargo Divider from Travall can help you reclaim some of that space – and keep everyone safe!

The post Staying Organized with an SUV Cargo Divider from Travall appeared first on MyDogLikes.

The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best Snow

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowI smell the first snow if the season! Sure, we had a few dustings in late October and November, but not enough to really call it a first snow. Snow is nice, but I don’t enjoy it as much as I used to. Katie and I used to really tear it up in the snow, but now I sniff around and go back inside, leaving the wild stuff for my younger sisters.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowLast winter was lousy, not much snow, Mom broke her ankle, weather was too warm, all in all, not really what we dream of. It was also Madison’s first winter, but she doesn’t seem to remember a whole lot about it and is really enjoying the cold and snow now!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowBailie, our resident wild child, who loves to be immature, and have as much fun as possible in life, is diving head first into winter right now as well!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowI think it might be some law of physics, but I’m not sure when it comes to combining energy levels. If you put two bundles of energy like Bailie and Madison together you will get an explosion. These explosions make for some fun viewing opportunities and photos! And they are off to perform their warm up lap!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowWrestle running is what I call this style of running. After completing a warm up lap or two, the wrestling starts to creep in to get the two bundles of energy primed for the real wild explosions!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowThe two moving bodies connect and the wrestle mania begins.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowSize has no meaning in these games. Little Miss Sassy Pants is never afraid to stand up to Bailie who is much bigger.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowMadison radiates boundless energy and the desire to take down the larger opponent!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowNo more battling on all fours! It’s turned into an all twos style of wrestling!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowTime out! Madison seems to have some secret information about the game to pass on to Bailie. Bailie is listening and is ready to carry on.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowApparently, they need to run some more laps to re tank their energy levels. Go dogs go!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowI don’t know about you all, but all the crazy play is wearing me out! I think I will go back into the warm house, have a snack, and take a little nap! Do you enjoy playing out in the snow as much as Bailie and Madison do?

 

The post The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best Snow appeared first on My GBGV Life.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowI smell the first snow if the season! Sure, we had a few dustings in late October and November, but not enough to really call it a first snow. Snow is nice, but I don’t enjoy it as much as I used to. Katie and I used to really tear it up in the snow, but now I sniff around and go back inside, leaving the wild stuff for my younger sisters.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowLast winter was lousy, not much snow, Mom broke her ankle, weather was too warm, all in all, not really what we dream of. It was also Madison’s first winter, but she doesn’t seem to remember a whole lot about it and is really enjoying the cold and snow now!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowBailie, our resident wild child, who loves to be immature, and have as much fun as possible in life, is diving head first into winter right now as well!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowI think it might be some law of physics, but I’m not sure when it comes to combining energy levels. If you put two bundles of energy like Bailie and Madison together you will get an explosion. These explosions make for some fun viewing opportunities and photos! And they are off to perform their warm up lap!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowWrestle running is what I call this style of running. After completing a warm up lap or two, the wrestling starts to creep in to get the two bundles of energy primed for the real wild explosions!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowThe two moving bodies connect and the wrestle mania begins.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowSize has no meaning in these games. Little Miss Sassy Pants is never afraid to stand up to Bailie who is much bigger.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowMadison radiates boundless energy and the desire to take down the larger opponent!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowNo more battling on all fours! It’s turned into an all twos style of wrestling!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowTime out! Madison seems to have some secret information about the game to pass on to Bailie. Bailie is listening and is ready to carry on.

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowApparently, they need to run some more laps to re tank their energy levels. Go dogs go!

My GBGV Life The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best SnowI don’t know about you all, but all the crazy play is wearing me out! I think I will go back into the warm house, have a snack, and take a little nap! Do you enjoy playing out in the snow as much as Bailie and Madison do?

 

The post The First Snow Of The Season Is The Best Snow appeared first on My GBGV Life.

Naughty or Nice List?

If you ask Mr. N, he’s practically perfect in every way. The real test is what would Santa say? Is he on the naughty or nice list this year? Naughty Car: He’s still unhappy about

The post Naughty or Nice List? appeared first on Tenacious Little Terrier.

If you ask Mr. N, he’s practically perfect in every way. The real test is what would Santa say? Is he on the naughty or nice list this year? Naughty Car: He’s still unhappy about

The post Naughty or Nice List? appeared first on Tenacious Little Terrier.

First Snow Fun!

We got our first significant snow of the season over the weekend; we woke up Sunday morning to about 5 inches of the white stuff on the ground. I decided to take the K9 crew for a walk, which turned out to be adventurous (no photos this time – I was kinda busy trying to […]

We got our first significant snow of the season over the weekend; we woke up Sunday morning to about 5 inches of the white stuff on the ground. I decided to take the K9 crew for a walk, which turned out to be adventurous (no photos this time – I was kinda busy trying to […]

Pet Winery Winner!

Thanks to all who entered our fun give-away!!!! (Pssst: if you didn’t win, Cody is having a give-away for Pet Winery this Friday so stop by!)

Now it’s time to announce the lucky winner! Huge congratulations to:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Woooo hooo you are gonna have a FUN holiday for sure!!!

Barks and licks and love, Dakota

 

Thanks to all who entered our fun give-away!!!! (Pssst: if you didn’t win, Cody is having a give-away for Pet Winery this Friday so stop by!)

Now it’s time to announce the lucky winner! Huge congratulations to:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Woooo hooo you are gonna have a FUN holiday for sure!!!

Barks and licks and love, Dakota

 

Feeding Your New Puppy: Tips for the First Year

Guest Author

You wouldn’t feed your baby adult food, would you?

In the same vein, puppies should not be fed food that is specially formulated for adult dogs. Quite simply, the nutritional needs of a growing pup are different from those of a grown dog.

But how exactly is a new puppy’s nutritional needs different from that of an adult dog?

Nutritional needs of puppies

new puppy beagle

A dog’s nutritional requirements will depend on a few factors, including its age, size, and breed. As such, you have to pay keen attention to these when choosing a suitable puppy food for the latest addition to your household.

Your new puppy’s body is working double time to sustain growth and development. As such, he needs the right nutrients to sustain both.

Before you go out to buy food and supplies for your pet in a brick-and-mortar or online pet store, you should also be aware that the newest member of your pack should be given food with high quality ingredients, free from harmful toxins.

Compared to food formulated for adult canines, your puppy’s food should have more calories. For example, a serving of quality puppy food will contain 445 kcal while a serving of adult dog food may contain only 375 kcal. Those extra calories are necessary because your puppy is still growing while the calories in adult dog food are going to be used for maintenance.

Apart from the difference in the amount of calories per serving, puppy food also contains more fats and proteins compared to adult dog food.

If there is one good reason why you should avoid feeding your puppy adult dog food, it is because feeding your young furry friend with adult food can deprive him of vital nutrients that support optimal growth and development.

Feeding your new puppy through different stages

new puppy stages

From six to 12 weeks old, your new puppy can start eating specially formulated puppy food four times a day.

At around three to six months, you can begin to decrease the number of times you feed him. When your puppy reaches three months of age, you should begin to notice him outgrowing his pudginess. If he still has not outgrown this stage, you should continue feeding him in puppy-sized portions.

When your puppy has reached six months of age, you can begin feeding him twice a day.

Making the switch to adult dog food

new puppy adult

If you own a small breed pup, you can begin the transition to adult dog food at around seven to nine months. On the other hand, if you own a medium to large breed puppy, you can make the switch at a later time, at around 12 months or a little longer.

Do not rush into making the switch to adult dog food. It will not hurt your young furry pal to continue eating puppy food for a little while longer.

When you do make the switch to adult dog food, make sure that your puppy transitions gradually for the first few days. Mix the old dog food with the new food, gradually increasing the new food as the days pass. Otherwise, his tummy can become upset.

Checking if your puppy is adequately fed

new puppy fed

Your pup’s veterinarian is the best person to ask if your pet is adequately fed.

Veterinarians use a body conditioning score to evaluate dogs, with a score of one for thin and emaciated dogs and five for obese pets. Ideally, puppies aged between eight and ten weeks should have a score of two.

Puppies with a score of two in the body conditioning score system will have visible ribs and back bones. When you are looking at your new pup, you should be able to see its waist while looking down at him.

At around five months of age, your newest pack member should start getting leaner as his rapid development begins to taper off.

An opportunity for training

new puppy sitting

Your puppy’s first year is crucial for his training. This also applies to feeding.

During your pup’s initial months in your home, all family members should make a conscious effort to thwart its begging. Quite simply, you have to resist the temptation to give him table scraps and unhealthy treats. In fact, feeding your new pup table scraps is one of the biggest mistakes that you should avoid.

Teaching your new pup not to beg for food will not only help him avoid weight problems. More importantly, it can also prevent behavioral problems.

As a pet owner, it is one of your responsibilities to make sure that your new puppy meets its nutritional needs to support its growth, health, and wellness. For more information about feeding, consult your veterinarian.

AUTHOR BIO

Farah Al-Khojai is the Managing Partner of Pets Delight. A passionate entrepreneur, Farah holds a BSC in Government from the London School of Economics. She is always on the lookout for new opportunities to develop and grow the pet retail and wholesale market in the UAE and beyond, and is proud to be at the helm of the first and the largest pet care provider in the market representing world-class brand including P&G, Savic, Zolux, Flamingo, Ruffwear and Rogz.

 

The post Feeding Your New Puppy: Tips for the First Year appeared first on Wag The Dog UK.

Guest Author

You wouldn’t feed your baby adult food, would you?

In the same vein, puppies should not be fed food that is specially formulated for adult dogs. Quite simply, the nutritional needs of a growing pup are different from those of a grown dog.

But how exactly is a new puppy’s nutritional needs different from that of an adult dog?

Nutritional needs of puppies

new puppy beagle

A dog’s nutritional requirements will depend on a few factors, including its age, size, and breed. As such, you have to pay keen attention to these when choosing a suitable puppy food for the latest addition to your household.

Your new puppy’s body is working double time to sustain growth and development. As such, he needs the right nutrients to sustain both.

Before you go out to buy food and supplies for your pet in a brick-and-mortar or online pet store, you should also be aware that the newest member of your pack should be given food with high quality ingredients, free from harmful toxins.

Compared to food formulated for adult canines, your puppy’s food should have more calories. For example, a serving of quality puppy food will contain 445 kcal while a serving of adult dog food may contain only 375 kcal. Those extra calories are necessary because your puppy is still growing while the calories in adult dog food are going to be used for maintenance.

Apart from the difference in the amount of calories per serving, puppy food also contains more fats and proteins compared to adult dog food.

If there is one good reason why you should avoid feeding your puppy adult dog food, it is because feeding your young furry friend with adult food can deprive him of vital nutrients that support optimal growth and development.

Feeding your new puppy through different stages

new puppy stages

From six to 12 weeks old, your new puppy can start eating specially formulated puppy food four times a day.

At around three to six months, you can begin to decrease the number of times you feed him. When your puppy reaches three months of age, you should begin to notice him outgrowing his pudginess. If he still has not outgrown this stage, you should continue feeding him in puppy-sized portions.

When your puppy has reached six months of age, you can begin feeding him twice a day.

Making the switch to adult dog food

new puppy adult

If you own a small breed pup, you can begin the transition to adult dog food at around seven to nine months. On the other hand, if you own a medium to large breed puppy, you can make the switch at a later time, at around 12 months or a little longer.

Do not rush into making the switch to adult dog food. It will not hurt your young furry pal to continue eating puppy food for a little while longer.

When you do make the switch to adult dog food, make sure that your puppy transitions gradually for the first few days. Mix the old dog food with the new food, gradually increasing the new food as the days pass. Otherwise, his tummy can become upset.

Checking if your puppy is adequately fed

new puppy fed

Your pup’s veterinarian is the best person to ask if your pet is adequately fed.

Veterinarians use a body conditioning score to evaluate dogs, with a score of one for thin and emaciated dogs and five for obese pets. Ideally, puppies aged between eight and ten weeks should have a score of two.

Puppies with a score of two in the body conditioning score system will have visible ribs and back bones. When you are looking at your new pup, you should be able to see its waist while looking down at him.

At around five months of age, your newest pack member should start getting leaner as his rapid development begins to taper off.

An opportunity for training

new puppy sitting

Your puppy’s first year is crucial for his training. This also applies to feeding.

During your pup’s initial months in your home, all family members should make a conscious effort to thwart its begging. Quite simply, you have to resist the temptation to give him table scraps and unhealthy treats. In fact, feeding your new pup table scraps is one of the biggest mistakes that you should avoid.

Teaching your new pup not to beg for food will not only help him avoid weight problems. More importantly, it can also prevent behavioral problems.

As a pet owner, it is one of your responsibilities to make sure that your new puppy meets its nutritional needs to support its growth, health, and wellness. For more information about feeding, consult your veterinarian.

AUTHOR BIO

Farah Al-Khojai is the Managing Partner of Pets Delight. A passionate entrepreneur, Farah holds a BSC in Government from the London School of Economics. She is always on the lookout for new opportunities to develop and grow the pet retail and wholesale market in the UAE and beyond, and is proud to be at the helm of the first and the largest pet care provider in the market representing world-class brand including P&G, Savic, Zolux, Flamingo, Ruffwear and Rogz.

 

The post Feeding Your New Puppy: Tips for the First Year appeared first on Wag The Dog UK.